Justice Reflections From Fr. Claude Mostowik

Fourth Sunday of the Year

Jesus gives us a glimpse into God’s heart through his preaching. The gospel and first reading reveal the sentiments of God’s heart towards people. The Beatitudes are a radical inaugural proclamation of Jesus’ ministry. They are fundamental, essential, and far-reaching as well as uncompromising, activist, and revolutionary. Many often try to tame the Beatitudes.  Nearly every time Jesus teaches or heals, the barbs emerge as even “good people” are angered and threatened by Jesus’ broad welcome for the so-called dregs of society and embodied the spaciousness of God’s reign rather than narrow human rules that judge people right and wrong. 

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Justice Reflections From Fr. Claude Mostowik

Third Sunday of the Year

Robert Ellsberg, in A Living Gospel, describes how the gospel is written in the lives of people different people living extraordinary lives. Ellsberg focuses on people like Dorothy Day, Charles de Foucauld, Henri Nouwen, Thomas Merton, Flannery O'Connor, and Oscar Romero who knew little of their legacy with contributions beyond their lives. However, as Annie Lamott points out, they ‘showed up’. In many cases, they participated in what Fr Gregory Boyles says, the strategy of Jesus was not centred in taking the right stand on issues, but rather in standing in the right place – with the outcasts and those relegated to the margins.

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Justice Reflections From Fr. Claude Mostowik

Second Sunday of the Year

Thomas Merton said, ‘If you want to identify me, ask me not where I live, or what I like to eat, or how I comb my hair, but ask me what I am living for.’ This question can be terrifying as it forces us to articulate what we truly believe and burn for.  We are invited today by the gospel to join with people such as Merton and ask ourselves what and for whom we live? What do we long for?

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Justice Reflections From Fr. Claude Mostowik

Manifestation of Jesus to the Peoples of all Nations

During Advent, receptivity and waiting were its themes. Epiphany highlights the themes of our response to God’s presence in our lives. We are beckoned to move beyond all we think we know and allowing something new stir within us as we look for something new on the horizon. We strike out for something deeper. We do not just talk about our desire but walk intentionally toward it and making concrete choices along the way.

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Justice Reflections From Fr. Claude Mostowik

Mary, the Mother of God

After Christmas Day we no longer hear Christmas carols on radio or elsewhere. However, the church reminds us that Christmas is not a one-day-event but an ongoing part of our lives. Today, with Mary, the Mother of God-become-human, we ponder what Christ’s birth means for humanity every day of the year.  Rather than gathering around the manger like the shepherds, we gather with the one who transforms us into brothers and sisters – each bearing God’s image. We are reminded that each day is Christmas where we can encounter God in the people we know and love and those we find it hard to love.

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