Justice Reflections From Fr. Claude Mostowik

Feast of the Ascension

We are called to remember who we are and today we are being named ‘Theophilus’ <the lover of God> a title addressed to a variety of communities. Today’s feast can cause us to wrestle with our rational side. People have become impatient and even left the church because of a focus on ‘heaven up there’ which does not speak to the everyday lives of people. What we are called to is to see the world differently where God’s love comes together with love of neighbour and all creation. Ascension is not about Christ’s absence, but his presence everywhere. We are reminded that it is not just how Jesus is present in the world but our presence. We cannot separate his presence and our witness. 

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Justice Reflections From Fr. Claude Mostowik

Sixth Sunday of Easter

God is constantly enlarging the boundaries of love, and we are invited to adapt our lives to ever inclusive patterns of love. This is Jesus’ final message which also brims with words of affirmation: ‘You are my friends!’ Jesus’ discourse is about farewell, assurances, final instructions and promises – promises to remain with them. Jesus’ parting words summarise his words concerning our call to love the ‘other’ especially the most vulnerable. He is our point of reference – seeing the world with the eyes of God and it is less likely that our decisions will come out of greed, revenge, or prejudice and involve countering dominating and controlling structures that prevent people from experiencing life to the full. Keeping the commandments does not involve legalism but the heart, relationship, with the other and with God. we are taken on another direction. When love of neighbour is uppermost our relationship to neighbour, the excluded, the unheard takes on a different meaning.

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Australia and the US withdrawal from Afghanistan. What will it mean?

A Perspective from a Hazara Asylum Seeker from Afghanistan

With the expected departure of US and Australian forces from Afghanistan, it is seems that the country is returning to the era of the brutal Taliban regime. To sit with the Taliban now, after fighting them for 20 years is not only accepting their regime but also giving them legitimacy. This begs the question whether war was a means to testing heavy and modern weapons on a vulnerable and defenceless people.

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